Thursday, November 20, 2014

Japanese World Unic Culture

Moshi mosh minna ^__^
Today, i would have some interesting topic that i want to share with everyone. And i bet it absolutely will entertain you all (Who have some interest about Japan). Curious about it? Come on, Rilakkuma will bring us about the topic i want to share it. And remember... this description maybe take you such a long hour to read it and i hope u all ready to spend your time to read this post...

Let's get START!


So, What things comes at first when you HEARD the WORDS “JAPAN” ?

 
As well as the Otaku one and also as a person who’s more relay into Japanese Things a.k.a Japanese Mania, here… I make some list about the things which I knew a lot about JAPAN :-


~~~ ANIME ~~~


- Anime (Japanese: アニメ, [anime] ) are Japanese animated productions usually featuring hand-drawn or computer animation. The word is the abbreviated pronunciation of "animation" in Japanese, where this term references all animation. In other languages, the term is defined as animation from Japan or as a Japanese-disseminated animation style often characterized by colorful graphics, vibrant characters and fantastic themes. Arguably, the stylization approach to the meaning may open up the possibility of anime produced in countries other than Japan. For simplicity, many Westerners strictly view anime as an animation product from Japan.


~~~ MANGA ~~~



- Manga (漫画 ) are comics created in Japan, or by Japanese creators in the Japanese language, conforming to a style developed in Japan in the late 19th century. They have a long and complex pre-history in earlier Japanese art.

In Japan, people of all ages read manga. The medium includes works in a broad range of genres: action-adventure, romance, sports and games, historical drama, comedy, science fiction and fantasy, mystery, suspense, detective, horror, sexuality, and business/commerce, among others.

 Since the 1950s, manga has steadily become a major part of the Japanese publishing industry, representing a ¥406 billion market in Japan in 2007 (approximately $3.6 billion) and ¥420 billion ($5.5 billion) in 2009.

Manga have also gained a significant worldwide audience. In Europe and the Middle East the market is worth $250 million. In 2008, in the U.S. and Canada, the manga market was valued at $175 million. The markets in France and the United States are about the same size. Manga stories are typically printed in black-and-white, although some full-color manga exist (e.g. Colorful).

In Japan, manga are usually serialized in large manga magazines, often containing many stories, each presented in a single episode to be continued in the next issue. If the series is successful, collected chapters may be republished in tankōbon volumes, frequently but not exclusively, paperback books.

 A manga artist (mangaka in Japanese) typically works with a few assistants in a small studio and is associated with a creative editor from a commercial publishing company. If a manga series is popular enough, it may be animated after or even during its run. Sometimes manga are drawn centering on previously existing live-action or animated films.

The term manga (kanji: 漫画; hiragana: まんが; katakana: マンガ) is a Japanese word referring both to comics and cartooning. "Manga" as a term used outside Japan refers specifically to comics originally published in Japan.

Manga-influenced comics, among original works, exist in other parts of the world, particularly in China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan ("manhua"), and South Korea ("manhwa"). In France, "la nouvelle manga" has developed as a form of bande dessinée comics drawn in styles influenced by manga. There are also OEL manga in America too.


~~~ VIDEO GAME ~~~



- Japanese game development is often identified with the golden age of videogames - particularly Nintendo under Shigeru Miyamoto and Hiroshi Yamauchi, and Sega during the same time period - and its industry dominated the field during the 1980's and 1990's, remaining dominant until the 2000's.


~~~ COSPLAY ~~~



- A costume that imitates a (usually fictional) character, especially from Japanese media (such as manga, anime, tokusatsu, video games, and Japanese pop music bands).

~~~ VOCALOID ~~~



- A computer remixing and voice editing program, in which one is supplied with different seiyuu, or voice actors. one shall proceed to type the melody and lyric of a song, and upon pressing play, hear that character sing the chosen song. There are many different vocaloids, but the most common is the first... Hatsune Miku, literally meaning 'voice of the future' . She dons bright blue pig tails, a super tiny mini skirt, arm warmers, and flings a leek. There is much of vocaloid on youtube and nico video.


~~~ OTAKU ~~~



-  Otaku is the honorific word of Taku (home). Otaku is extremely negative in meaning as it is used to refer to someone who stays at home all the time and doesn't have a life (no social life, no love life, etc)

Usually an otaku person has nothing better to do with their life so they pass the time by watching anime, playing videogames, surfing the internet
(otaku is also used to refer to a nerd/hacker/programmer).

In the Western culture, people confuse otaku to be something positive like
"Guru". If you think about it, it's not really good to be called a guru if it means you are a total loser who can't socialize with other people except through the Internet. Other Japanese words which have been confused by Westerners also include but not limited to: Anime, Manga, etc.


~~~ JPOP ~~~



- J-pop (often stylized as J-POP; Japanese: ジェイポップ jeipoppu; an abbreviation for Japanese pop), natively also known simply as pops, is a musical genre that entered the musical mainstream of Japan in the 1990s. Modern J-pop has its roots in traditional Japanese music, but significantly in 1960s pop and rock music, such as The Beatles and The Beach Boys, which led to Japanese rock bands such as Happy End fusing rock with Japanese music in the early 1970s.

 J-pop was further defined by new wave groups in the late 1970s, particularly electronic synthpop band Yellow Magic Orchestra and pop rock band Southern All Stars. Eventually, J-pop replaced kayōkyoku ("Lyric Singing Music", a term for Japanese pop music from the 1920s to the 1980s) in the Japanese music scene. The term was coined by the Japanese media to distinguish Japanese music from foreign music, and now refers to most Japanese popular music. The musical genre has been immensely influential in many other music styles, and hence those of neighboring regions, where the style has been copied by neighboring Asian regions, who have also borrowed the name to form their own musical identities.


~~~ JROCK~~~
 
- Popular mainstream Japanese rock bands would be Glay, L'Arc~en~ciel, Dir en Grey, Malice Mizer and Kagrra. The genre are same goes as “VK”.



~~~ VISUAL KEI ~~~



- Brand of Japanese rock music where band members (mostly men) wear elaborate make up and stage costumes, much of the time crossdressing. The "kei" is japanese for style of type, meaning "visual style music" The music ranges from 80's-esque goth rock, to heavy metal to punk and usually some combo of the 3. Most bands are indies (independant or on indies labels) but a few make it to major labels such as Malice Mizer, Raphael, and Dir En Grey. Also seen written "VK" or sometimes incorrectly lumped in with the catch all word "Jrock", meaning all japanese rock music.


~~~ PURIKURA ~~~



- Purikura or (プリクラ) is the shortened form of the trademarked name プリント倶楽部 (purintokurabu) or Print Club. It's like 'hoover' or 'biro' in that the trademark has come to mean all incarnations of the product.

Purikura is a popular activity among Japanese school children and young adults, mainly girls, young women and young couples.

Purikura booths let you take digital pictures with your friends which you can then decorate with the touch-screen and stylus. You can add frames, stamps, sparkles
(in some machines these print as real glitter) and you can write and draw freehand with a variety of pen colors and styles.

Your finished pictures are then printed off on sticker paper in multiple copies so you can cut them up and share them out. Purikura pictures are often used to decorate stationery in school but you can use them anywhere! Young girls sometimes trade their cutest purikura with each other.

New machines are very popular and those that have been featured in a magazine often have queues of girls waiting to use them.

There are machines in many countries all over the world so if you get the chance, try it out!


~~~ CROSS DRESSING BOYS ~~~



- CROSS-DRESSING - In Japan, men who wear women's clothing are called jyosoku (女装子). The use of the word "otokonoko" for cross-dressing became popular online a decade ago, but manga and anime depicted boys who look like girls for years before. Anime Andromeda Shun and gender-bender gag manga Stop!! Hibari-kun! featured pretty male characters who were often confused with females.

Historically, clothing is connected with rank and identity in Japan. Over a thousand years ago, royal edicts dictated what types of clothes and even what colors men and women of certain classes could wear. Clothing as a gender marker remains strong in Japan—so does the desire to break down that gender marker, yet at the same time preserve it.


~~~ HELLO KITTY ~~~



- Hello Kitty (ハローキティ Harōkiti?) (full name Kitty White (キティ・ホワイト Kiti howaito) is a fictional character produced by the Japanese company Sanrio, created by Yuko Shimizu and currently designed by Yuko Yamaguchi. She is depicted as an anthropomorphic white Japanese bobtail cat with a red bow.

The character's first appearance on an item, a vinyl coin purse, was introduced in Japan in 1974 and brought to the United States in 1976. The character is a staple of the kawaii segment of Japanese popular culture. By 2010, Sanrio had groomed Hello Kitty into a global marketing phenomenon worth $5 billion a year. By 2014, when Hello Kitty was 40 years old, it was worth $7 billion a year, all without any advertising.

Originally aimed at pre-adolescent females, Hello Kitty's market has broadened to include adult consumers. She can be found on a variety of products ranging from school supplies to fashion accessories and high-end consumer products. Several Hello Kitty TV series, targeted towards young children, have been produced. Hello Kitty is also the main character at the two Japanese Sanrio theme parks, Harmonyland and the indoor Sanrio Puroland.


~~~ RILAKkUMA ~~~



- Rilakkuma (リラックマ Rilakkuma?, a combination of the Japanese pronunciation of relax and the Japanese word for bear) is a character designed by Aki Kondo, produced by San-X in 2003. The factual story for Rilakkuma's being is that he mysteriously appears in the female office lady Kaoru's apartment one day. He is a soft toy bear who has apparently decided to take up residence there. On his back is a zipper which when opened reveals a light blue polka dot patterned material. The reason for the zipper on his back is unknown.

He was first seen in a series of picture books called Rilakkuma Seikatsu produced by San-X but since has become equally popular as a soft-toy character. In the picture books, he is often seen dressed up in a variety of costumes such as a kappa costume. In addition, it is implied that even in his usual appearance, his entire lower body is a costume, which he will often replace when it gets old or dirty (Rilakkuma is frequently seen sitting around waiting for suits that look exactly like him to dry on the clothes line). However, it is not clear whether his head is also part of his costume.

His favorite foods are dango, pancakes, omurice, custard pudding, and grapes. True to his name, he enjoys relaxing and his favorite things include sleeping, lying around, watching television, listening to music and soaking in hot springs. He loves using Kaoru's yellow bean bag pillow, although there has been some controversy whether or not the yellow bean bag pillow is in fact Kiiroitori.

~~~ Funassyi ~~~



- Funassyi (ふなっしー Funasshī) is a Japanese mascot character, unofficially representing the city of Funabashi, Chiba. It was created by a citizen of Funabashi to promote his/her own website. It later appeared at events, festivals, TV programs and commercials, gaining popularity all over Japan.

Funassyi is neither a boy nor a girl, but a pear (the Japanese for "nothing" (無し) and "pear" () are both pronounced nashi). Its parents are ordinary pear trees. Funassyi is the fourth of their 274 children. Its birthday is July 4, and it is 1,876 years old as of 2014.

Its full name is Funadius IV (フナディウス4 Funadiusu Yonsei), and its favorite food is peaches. The character is fond of heavy metal, revealing that it bought Deep Purple's Machine Head as its first album, and is also fond of Aerosmith.

Funassyi's "brother" Funagoro (ふなごろー Funagorō), who is part caterpillar, was introduced on October 15, 2014.


~~~ KIMONO ~~~



- The kimono (着物) is a Japanese traditional garment. The word "kimono", which literally means a "thing to wear" (ki "wear" and mono "thing"), has come to denote these full-length robes. The standard plural of the word kimono in English is kimonos, but the unmarked Japanese plural kimono is also sometimes used.

Kimono are T-shaped, straight-lined robes worn so that the hem falls to the ankle, with attached collars and long, wide sleeves. Kimono are wrapped around the body, always with the left side over the right (except when dressing the dead for burial) and secured by a sash called an obi, which is tied at the back. Kimono are generally worn with traditional footwear (especially zōri or geta) and split-toe socks (tabi).

Today, kimono are most often worn by women, and on special occasions. Traditionally, unmarried women wore a style of kimono called furisode, with almost floor-length sleeves, on special occasions. A few older women and even fewer men still wear the kimono on a daily basis. Men wear the kimono most often at weddings, tea ceremonies, and other very special or very formal occasions. Professional sumo wrestlers are often seen in the kimono because they are required to wear traditional Japanese dress whenever appearing in public.


~~~ YAKUZA ~~~



- Yakuza (ヤクザ?, [jakuza]), also known as gokudō (極道), are members of transnational organized crime syndicates originating in Japan. The Japanese police, and media by request of the police, call them bōryokudan (暴力団, "violence group"), while the yakuza call themselves "ninkyō dantai" (任侠団体 or 仁侠団体?, "chivalrous organizations").

The yakuza are notorious for their strict codes of conduct and very organized nature. They have a large presence in the Japanese media and operate internationally with an estimated 103,000 members.



~~~ GEISHA ~~~



- Geisha (芸者), geiko (芸子) or geigi (芸妓) are traditional Japanese female entertainers who act as hostesses and whose skills include performing various Japanese arts such as classical music, dance, games and conversation.


~~~ MAID café (kawaii girl)~~~



- The maid cafe, ultimately, has its basis in fandom. It was the Japanese otaku who realized the appeal of arriving home to be greeted by a cute girl in a traditional French maid’s uniform. The cute girl would smile, welcome him with sweet words, and tend to him throughout the evening. From there it was popularized by portrayals in many different anime and manga, including Hand Maid May and Mahoromatic.

As they have done so, the increased competition of maid cafe industry in Japan has made some use unusual tactics in order to attract customers. Maid Cafe have also expanded overseas to countries like China, Indonesia, South Korea, Taiwan, Australia, Hungary, the Czech Republic, France, Mexico, Canada and the United States.


~~~ YUKATTA FESTIVAL ~~~



- A yukata (浴衣) is a Japanese garment, a casual summer kimono usually made of cotton or synthetic fabric, and unlined. Yukata are worn by both men and women. Like other forms of traditional Japanese clothing, yukata are made with straight seams and wide sleeves. Men's yukata are distinguished by the shorter sleeve extension of approximately 10cm from the armpit seam, compared to the longer 20cm sleeve extension in women's yukata. A standard yukata ensemble consists of a cotton undergarment (juban), yukata, obi, bare feet, sandals (geta), a foldable or fixed hand fan, and a carry bag (kinchaku).

Kinchaku are used by both men and women to carry cellphones, sunglasses, wallets and tissue. For men, an optional hat or derby may also be worn to protect the head from the sun. Yukata literally means bath(ing) clothes, although their use is not limited to after-bath wear. Yukata are a common sight in Japan during the hot summer months.

Traditionally yukata were mostly made of indigo-dyed cotton but today a wide variety of colors and designs are available. As with kimono, the general rule with yukata is that younger people wear bright, vivid colors and bold patterns, while older people wear dark, matured colors and dull patterns. A child may wear a multicolored print and a young woman may wear a floral print, while an older woman would confine herself to a traditional dark blue with geometric patterns. Men in general may wear solid dark colors. Since the late 1990s, yukata have experienced a revival.

Yukata are worn at outdoor summer events such as hanabi (fireworks) displays and bon-odori festivals. Yukata are also worn at Japanese inns ryokan after bathing.


~~~ HARAJUKU FASHION  STYLE ~~~



- Harajuku (原宿) is a district in Shibuya, Tokyo, Japan. Harajuku is the common name given to a geographic area spreading from Harajuku Station to Omotesando, corresponding on official maps of Shibuya ward as Jingūmae 1 chōme to 4 chōme. In popular reference Harajuku also encompasses many smaller backstreets such as Takeshita Street and Cat Street spreading between Sendagaya in the north to Shibuya in the south.

Harajuku is known internationally as a center of Japanese youth culture and fashion. Shopping and dining options include many small, youth oriented, independent boutiques and cafés, but the neighborhood also attracts many larger international chain stores with high-end luxury merchandisers extensively represented along Omotesando.

Harajuku Station on the JR East Yamanote Line and Meiji-jingumae 'Harajuku' Station served by the Tokyo Metro Chiyoda Line and Tokyo Metro Fukutoshin Line also act as gateways to local attractions such as the Meiji Shrine, Yoyogi Park and Yoyogi National Gymnasium, making Harajuku and its environs one of the most popular destinations in Tokyo for both domestic and international tourists.

~~~ SHIBUYA STREET ~~~



- Shibuya (渋谷区 Shibuya-ku) is a special ward in Tokyo, Japan. As of 2008, it has an estimated population of 208,371 and a population density of 13,540 people per km². The total area is 15.11 km².

The name "Shibuya" is also used to refer to the shopping district which surrounds Shibuya Station, one of Tokyo's busiest railway stations. This area is known as one of the fashion centers of Japan, particularly for young people, and as a major nightlife area.


~~~ GINZA ~~~



- Ginza (銀座) is a district of Chūō, Tokyo, located south of Yaesu and Kyōbashi, west of Tsukiji, east of Yūrakuchō and Uchisaiwaichō, and north of Shinbashi.

It is known as an upscale area of Tokyo with numerous department stores, boutiques, restaurants and coffeehouses. Ginza is recognized as one of the most luxurious shopping districts in the world.


~~~ ROBOTIC ~~~



- There are many variations of Japanese robotics. Some different types of robots are: Humanoid Entertainment Robots, Androids, Animal (four legged) Robots, Social Robots, Guard Robots, and many more. There are also a variety of characteristics for these robots.

The Robotics industry is more important in Japan than any other country in the world. Japan employs over a quarter of a million industrial robot workers. In the next 15 years, Japan estimates that number to jump to over one million and they expect revenue for robotics to be near $70 billion by 2025.


~~~ FINAL FANTASY ~~~



- Final Fantasy (ファイナルファンタジー Fainaru Fantajī) is a media franchise created by Hironobu Sakaguchi, and is developed and owned by Square Enix (formerly Square). The franchise centers on a series of fantasy and science fantasy role-playing video games (RPGs), but includes motion pictures, anime, printed media, and other merchandise. The eponymous first game in the series, published in 1987, was conceived by Sakaguchi as his last-ditch effort in the game industry; the title was a success and spawned sequels. The video game series has since branched into other genres such as tactical role-playing, action role-playing, massively multiplayer online role-playing, racing, third-person shooter, fighting, and rhythm.

Although most Final Fantasy installments are stand-alone stories with different settings and main characters, they feature identical elements that define the franchise. Recurring elements include plot themes, character names, and game mechanics. Plots center on a group of heroes battling a great evil while exploring the characters' internal struggles and relationships. Character names are frequently derived from the history, languages, and mythologies of cultures worldwide.

The series has been commercially and critically successful; it is Square Enix's best selling video game franchise, with more than 100 million units sold, and one of the best-selling video game franchises. It was awarded a star on the Walk of Game in 2006, and holds seven Guinness World Records in the Guinness World Records Gamer's Edition 2008. The series is well known for its innovation, visuals, and music, such as the inclusion of full motion videos, photo-realistic character models, and orchestrated music by Nobuo Uematsu.

Final Fantasy has been a driving force in the video game industry, and the series has affected Square Enix's business practices and its relationships with other video game developers. It has also introduced many features now common in role-playing video games and has been credited with helping to popularize console-based RPGs in markets outside Japan.


~~~ CHERRY BLOSSOM ~~~



- A cherry blossom is the flower of any of several trees of genus Prunus, particularly the Japanese Cherry, Prunus serrulata, which is sometimes called sakura after the Japanese ( or ; さくら).

Cherry blossom is speculated to be native to the Himalayas. Currently it is widely distributed, especially in the temperate zone of the Northern Hemisphere such as: Europe, West Siberia, South Korea, China, Japan, United States, etc.

Many of the varieties that have been cultivated for ornamental use do not produce fruit. Edible cherries generally come from cultivars of the related species Prunus Avium and Prunus Cerasus.

~~~ Ichimatsu Doll ~~~



Japanese traditional dolls are known by the name ningyō (人形) in Japan, which literally means human shape.

There are various types of Japanese dolls, some representing children and babies, some the imperial court, warriors and heroes, fairy-tale characters, gods and (rarely) demons, and also people of the daily life of Japanese cities. Many have a long tradition and are still made today, for household shrines, for formal gift-giving, or for festival celebrations such as Hinamatsuri, the doll festival, or Kodomo no Hi, Children's Day. Some are manufactured as a local craft, to be purchased by pilgrims as a souvenir of a temple visit or some other trip.

The most popular one is Ichimatsu dolls. Ichimatsu dolls (ja:市松人形) represent little girls or boys, correctly proportioned and usually with flesh-colored skin and glass eyes. The original Ichimatsu were named after an 18th-century Kabuki actor, and must have represented an adult man, but since the late 19th century the term has applied to child dolls, usually made to hold in the arms, dress, and pose (either with elaborately made joints or with floppy cloth upper arms and thighs).

Baby boy dolls with mischievous expressions were most popular in the late 19th and early 20th century, but in 1927 the friendship doll exchange involved the creation of 58 32" dolls representing little girls, to be sent as a gift from Japan to the United States, and the aesthetic of these dolls influenced dollmakers to emulate this type of a solemn, gentle-looking little girl in elaborate kimono.


~~~ SUSHI ~~~



- Sushi (すし, 寿司, ?) is a Japanese food consisting of cooked vinegared rice (鮨飯 sushi-meshi) combined with other ingredients (ネタ neta), seafood, vegetables and sometimes tropical fruits. Ingredients and forms of sushi presentation vary widely, but the ingredient which all sushi have in common is rice (also referred to as shari (しゃり) or sumeshi (酢飯)).

Sushi can be prepared with either brown or white rice. Sushi is often prepared with raw seafood, but some common varieties of sushi use cooked ingredients or are vegetarian. Raw fish (or occasionally other meat) sliced and served without rice is called "sashimi".

Sushi is often served with gari (ginger), wasabi, and soy sauce. Popular garnishes are often made using daikon.

~~~ BEAUTIFUL MEN (Bishonen) ~~~



- Bishōnen (美少年?, also transliterated bishounen) is a Japanese term literally meaning "beautiful youth (boy)" and describes an aesthetic that can be found in disparate areas in East Asia: a young man whose beauty (and sexual appeal) transcends the boundary of gender or sexual orientation.

It has always shown the strongest manifestation in Japanese pop culture, gaining in popularity due to the androgynous glam rock bands of the 1970s, but it has roots in ancient Japanese literature, the homosocial and homoerotic ideals of the medieval Chinese imperial court and intellectuals, and Indian aesthetic concepts carried over from Hinduism, imported with Buddhism to China.

Also note that said alternative charisma is by no means unspeakable, taboo, or even open secret; young women make no attempt to hide their attraction, while more masculine heterosexual peers take no issue with recognizing bishounen as potentially fearsome rivals with enviable traits. Unlike in certain Western cultures, such admissions are no-risk, devoid of social stigma, and not normally expected to cast any doubts over one's own sexuality.

Today, bishōnen are very popular among girls and women in Japan. Reasons for this social phenomenon may include the unique male and female social relationships found within the genre. Some have theorized that bishōnen provide a non-traditional outlet for gender relations. Moreover, it breaks down stereotypes surrounding feminine male characters. These are often depicted with very strong martial arts abilities, sports talent, high intelligence, or comedic flair, traits that are usually assigned to the hero/protagonist.


~~~ YAOI/YURI ~~~



- Two words that mean same gender love in anime and manga. It can give people a nosebleed. (Yaoi is Boy+Boy Love and Yuri is Girl+Girl Love).

Sometimes it involves hentai.

To avoid hentai, go for
Shonen-Ai which is for Yaoi couples and Shoujo-Ai which is for Yuri couples.

Example with Naruto:
Yaoi: Naruto and Sasuke
Yuri: Sakura and Ino

Yaoi is for girls and Yuri is for boys. :)


~~~ UKE/SEME ~~~

- In anime and manga, especially shounen-ai, yaoi and hentai, uke is a general term for a partner in a relationship who is predominantly bottom and/or submissive. The equivalent for top is seme.


~~~ ORICON ~~~


- Oricon Inc. (株式会社オリコン Kabushiki-gaisha Orikon), established in 1999, is the holding company at the head of a Japanese corporate group that supplies statistics and information on music and the music industry in Japan. It started as Original Confidence Inc. (株式会社オリジナルコンフィデンス Kabushiki-gaisha Orijinaru Konfidensu), which was founded by Sōkō Koike in November 1967 and became known for its music charts. Oricon Inc. was originally set up as a subsidiary of Original Confidence and took over the latter’s Oricon record charts in April 2002.

In 2006, Oricon sued journalist Hiro Ugaya when he was quoted in a Cyzo magazine article suggesting that Oricon was fiddling its statistics to benefit certain management companies and labels, specifically Johnny and Associates. Ugaya condemned the lawsuit as an example of a strategic lawsuit against public participation (SLAPP) in Japan. The charges were later dropped by Oricon after a 33-month battle that devastated the reporters life. No charge was held against to the journalist.

They are compiled using data drawn from some 39,700 retail outlets (as of April 2011) and provide sales rankings of music CDs, DVDs, electronic games, and other entertainment products based on weekly tabulations. Results are announced every Tuesday and published in Oricon Style by subsidiary Oricon Entertainment Inc. The group also lists panel survey-based popularity ratings for television commercials on its official website.


~~~ ORICON SINGLE CHARTS ~~~



- Oricon Singles Chart is the Japanese music industry standard singles popularity chart issued daily, weekly, monthly and yearly by Oricon. Chart rankings are based on physical singles' sales. Oricon does not include download sales. In Japan, physical sales decreased sharply in the 2000s, while download sales hit three to four times the amount of single sales.

Original Confidence Inc., the original Oricon company, was founded by the former Snow Brand Milk Products promoter Sōkō Koike in 1967. That November, the company began publishing a singles chart on an experimental basis. Entitled Sōgō Geinō Shijō Chōsa (総合芸能市場調査) (English: Surveys of total entertainment markets), it went official on January 4, 1968.

Charts are published every Tuesday in Oricon Style and on Oricon’s official website. Every Monday, Oricon receives data from outlets, but data on merchandise sold through certain channels does not make it into the charts. For example, the debut single of NEWS, a pop group, was released only through 7-Eleven stores, which are not covered by Oricon, and its sales were not reflected in the Oricon charts. Oricon’s rankings of record sales are therefore not completely accurate. Before data was collected electronically, the charts were compiled on the basis of faxes that were sent from record shops.

The first number-one song of the Oricon Singles Chart was "Kitaguni no Futari (In a Lonesome City)" (ja) by Jackey Yoshikawa and his Blue Comets (ja) on November 2, 1967.


~~~ TOKYOHIVE ~~~



- Breaking J-pop news, videos, photos and celebrity gossip.


~~~ NHK ~~~



- NHK, Nippon Hoso Kyokai (Japan Broadcasting Corporation), is Japan’s only public broadcaster. As a public broadcaster funded by fees received from TV viewers, NHK delivers a wide range of impartial, high-quality programs, both at home and abroad.


~~~ ANIMAXX ~~~





- Animax (アニマックス Animakkusu), stylized as ANIMAX is a Japanese anime satellite television network, dedicated to broadcasting anime programming. A subsidiary of Japanese media conglomerate Sony, it is headquartered in New Pier Takeshiba North Tower (ニューピア竹芝ノースタワー Nyū Pia Takeshiba Nōsu Tawā) in Minato, Tokyo, Japan, with its co-founders and shareholders including Sony Pictures Entertainment Japan and the noted anime studios Sunrise, Toei Animation, TMS Entertainment and production company NAS.

Operating across Japan, Taiwan, India, Pakistan, South Korea, Southeast Asia, Hong Kong, Latin America (replacing Locomotion) and was launched in Europe (launching across Germany, Romania, Hungary, Czech Republic in 2007 (replacing Anime+ in Romania, Hungary, and Czech Republic), Slovakia (replacing Anime+), Spain and Portugal (both initially on sister channel AXN) in 2008, and soon to be launched in Poland (has been halted), Italy, France and several other countries), Africa and Australia (currently a two-hour block on Sci Fi Channel, which is co-owned by Sony Pictures Entertainment), Animax is the first and largest 24-hour network dedicated to anime in the world, with a viewer reach of over 89 million households, 62 countries and more than 17 languages.

Its title is a portmanteau of the words anime (アニメ) and max (マックス makkusu). It also has English language networks in Southeast Asia, South Asia, South Africa, United Kingdom (as a VOD service accompanied by a weekly block via Sony Movie Channel) and a two-hour network in Australia (via Sci Fi Channel). The channel operates in East Asia and select countries in Europe.


~~~ SUMO ~~~



- Sumo (相撲 sumō) is a competitive full-contact wrestling sport where a rikishi (wrestler) attempts to force another wrestler out of a circular ring (dohyō) or to touch the ground with anything other than the soles of the feet. The sport originated in Japan, the only country where it is practiced professionally. It is generally considered to be a gendai budō (a modern Japanese martial art), though this definition is misleading as the sport has a history spanning many centuries.

Many ancient traditions have been preserved in sumo, and even today the sport includes many ritual elements, such as the use of salt purification, from the days when sumo was used in the Shinto religion. Life as a wrestler is highly regimented, with rules laid down by the Sumo Association. Most sumo wrestlers are required to live in communal "sumo training stables", known in Japanese as heya, where all aspects of their daily lives—from meals to their manner of dress—are dictated by strict tradition.

In recent years, a number of high-profile controversies and scandals have rocked the sumo world, with a concomitant effect on its reputation and ticket sales. It has also greatly affected the sport's ability to attract new recruits.


~~~ TOKYO DISNEYLAND ~~~



- Tokyo Disneyland (東京ディズニーランド Tōkyō Dizunīrando) is a 115-acre (465,000 m2) theme park at the Tokyo Disney Resort in Urayasu, Chiba, Japan, near Tokyo.[1] Its main gate is directly adjacent to both Maihama Station and Tokyo Disneyland Station. It was the first Disney park to be built outside the United States, and it opened on April 15, 1983. The park was constructed by Walt Disney Imagineering in the same style as Disneyland in California and Magic Kingdom in Florida. It is owned by The Oriental Land Company, which licenses the theme from The Walt Disney Company. Tokyo Disneyland and its companion park, Tokyo DisneySea, are the only Disney parks not wholly or partially owned by the Walt Disney Company.

There are seven themed areas in the park: the World Bazaar; the four classic Disney lands: Adventureland, Westernland, Fantasyland and Tomorrowland; and two mini-lands: Critter Country and Mickey's Toontown. Many of the games and rides in these areas mirror those in the original Disneyland as they are based on American Disney films and fantasies. Fantasyland includes Peter Pan's Flight, Snow White's Scary Adventures, Dumbo the Flying Elephant and more based on classic Disney films and characters. The park is noted for its extensive open spaces, to accommodate the large crowds that visit the park.

 In 2013, Tokyo Disneyland hosted 8.7 million visitors, moving its ranking to the world's fourth most visited theme park surpassing Disneyland in Hong Kong, China, but falling behind Disneyland California, USA.



~~~ Fuji Mountain ~~~




Mount Fuji's exceptionally symmetrical cone, which is snow-capped several months a year, is a well-known symbol of Japan and it is frequently depicted in art and photographs, as well as visited by sightseers and climbers. It is one of Japan's "Three Holy Mountains" (三霊山 Sanreizan) along with Mount Tate and Mount Haku; it is a Special Place of Scenic Beauty, a Historic Site, and was added to the World Heritage List as a Cultural Site on June 22, 2013.

The mountain has been selected as a “cultural” rather than a “natural” heritage site. As per UNESCO, Mount Fuji has “inspired artists and poets and been the object of pilgrimage for centuries”. The 25 locations include the mountain itself, Fujisan Hongū Sengen Taisha and six other Sengen shrines, two lodging houses, Lake Yamanaka, Lake Kawaguchi, the eight Oshino Hakkai hot springs, two lava tree molds, the remains of the Fuji-kō cult in the Hitoana cave, Shiraito Falls, and Miho no Matsubara pine tree grove.
 



~~~ KOKURITSU ~~~



- National Stadium (国立霞ヶ丘陸上競技場 Kokuritsu Kasumigaoka Rikujō Kyogijō), is a stadium in Kasumigaoka, Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan. The stadium served as the main stadium for the opening and closing ceremonies, as well as being the venue for track and field events at the 1964 Summer Olympic Games. The Japan national football team's home matches and major football club cup finals are currently held at the stadium.

The current stadium, which opened in 1958 is planned to be demolished in 2015. The site will be redeveloped with a new larger-capacity National Olympic Stadium designed by architect Zaha Hadid.

The new stadium is set to be the main venue for the 2020 Summer Olympics and Paralympic Games, as well as the 2019 Rugby World Cup.



So, THAT'S ALL about JAPAN. Hope you guys can know a lot about Japan after this. Such a beautiful country to live, ne. And plus, I LOVE Japan. And for end this conversation, i wish my biggest thanks to all visitor who's willing to spend your time to read this post. Hontouni Arigatou Gozaimassu. btw, see you all again for the next post. Jane ^__^

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